I really appreciate your awesome 7 must-know bathroom remodeling tips! At the moment, I am helping my sister in renovating their bathroom. I am gathering more ideas on how could I help her and I definitely agree that considering the use of a heated floor, maximizing the space and choosing an appropriate, yet durable flooring will make it done perfectly!
Do-it-yourselfers can reap big savings with recycled or lightly used fixtures and building materials. Habitat for Humanity operates about 400 ReStores nationwide, which offer salvaged materials at half off home-center prices. One caveat: Many contractors won't work with salvaged items, or homeowner-supplied materials in general, because they don't want to assume the liability if something goes wrong. That said, if you're doing your own work, you can find anything from prehung doors to acrylic skylights to partial bundles of insulation. (To find a ReStore near you, visit habitat.org.)

Due to the proximity of the bedroom to one’s bathroom, noise is usually an issue for most homeowners. If there aren’t any windows attached to the bathroom, an exhaust fan should be installed as it can help in removing moisture. Likewise, if you want to reduce the noise made by your toilet tank while it’s being refilled, then you should install a modern inlet valve.
I really want to remodel my bathroom later on and I wanted to look up some ideas and tips on how to go about it. I didn’t think about adding recessed lights with some over the mirror as well! Having a dimmer would be a really nice thing to have in the morning as well when everything is too bright. That’s a great idea. Thank you so much for the tips and ideas!
For those who are thinking of putting their home up for sale five years from now, then it’s important to ensure that the value of your property would increase over time, consider having your home renovated for that purpose. On the other hand, if you’re planning to live in your home for a couple of years, it’s very important to ensure that the design of your bathroom is something you would really love and fit with your style and preferences.
Many homeowners consider obtaining a building permit as an unnecessary headache which can slow down the renovation process, but permits are a necessary part of the process in most cases, which can come back to haunt you if not obtained in the first place. Building permits are necessary to ensure your house remodel meets structural and fire safety requirements and code inspectors in most jurisdictions can make you rip out non-conforming work if not up to snuff. This can create a very expensive headache when looking to sell your home down the road. It’s always advisable to think ahead and ensure the permit process is followed. Check out our DIY home improvement rules for more tips.
For those who are thinking of putting their home up for sale five years from now, then it’s important to ensure that the value of your property would increase over time, consider having your home renovated for that purpose. On the other hand, if you’re planning to live in your home for a couple of years, it’s very important to ensure that the design of your bathroom is something you would really love and fit with your style and preferences.
If your home is lacking plumbing shut-off valves in the area you are working on, you may have to shut the water off at the main valve, leaving your home without access to running water. Plan ahead and place containers of water in the fridge for drinking, on the counter for cooking and have buckets of water available to flush the toilet. An easy way to do this is to fill the bathtub with water and place a bucket nearby to pour into the toilet bowl.
One of the tricks that I’m always amazed by is the way he fills nail holes after installing trim.  Normally, you would pick up a wax filler stick from your hardware store in a similar color as your stain or paint color.  These are a bit pricey, especially since it’s just a stick of wax. Mr. Gracious’ method of filling nail holes is, in my opinion, brilliant and much more frugal.
Before you begin a remodeling job, invite the local Habitat for Humanity chapter to remove materials and fixtures for later resale. "About 85 percent of a house is reusable," says B.J. Perkins, Habitat's ReUse program manager, in Austin, Texas. "We can do a total takedown, or do a cherry-pick job and take the cabinets, the tub, the sink, and so on." You save space in the landfill, collect a charitable tax credit for the donation, and help a good cause. Visit Habitat to find an affiliate near you.

If your addition calls for clapboard siding, for instance, you can save more in the long run by ponying up now for the preprimed and prepainted variety. It costs an extra 10 to 20 cents per foot, but "you'll wind up paying for half as many paint jobs down the road," says Paul Eldrenkamp, owner of Byggmeister, a design-build remodeling firm in Newton, Massachusetts. The reason? Factory finishes are applied on dry wood under controlled conditions—no rain, no harsh sun. "I used prefinished claps on my house about ten years ago and the only flaw in the finish is the occasional mildew spot, easily washed off," Eldrenkamp says. "The paint looks as if it'll be good for another ten years, easily."


If your walls are in such rough shape that it would take a painting contractor days of filling and sanding to make them ready for the roller, consider using materials such as Texturglas, from Deerfield Beach, Florida— based company Roos International. A breathable, nontoxic wall covering made of fine glass filaments, Texturglas has a similar look and feel to the fiberglass matting used in auto-body work. It's available in a variety of surface patterns, takes paint readily, and is designed to be installed right on top of existing surfaces, adding strength while covering up dings.
If your addition calls for clapboard siding, for instance, you can save more in the long run by ponying up now for the preprimed and prepainted variety. It costs an extra 10 to 20 cents per foot, but "you'll wind up paying for half as many paint jobs down the road," says Paul Eldrenkamp, owner of Byggmeister, a design-build remodeling firm in Newton, Massachusetts. The reason? Factory finishes are applied on dry wood under controlled conditions—no rain, no harsh sun. "I used prefinished claps on my house about ten years ago and the only flaw in the finish is the occasional mildew spot, easily washed off," Eldrenkamp says. "The paint looks as if it'll be good for another ten years, easily."
Choosing the right layout for your powder room is important, not just for you but for your guests. This is the bathroom that your friends and neighbors will use most often in your home, rather than traveling to the private bathroom next to your bedroom.Powder rooms got their name from the 18th century, and are still largely used for the same purpose: as a space for guests to freshen up. Nowadays, powder rooms typically include a toilet and a sink, but never a tub or a shower. If you are looking to build a custom powder room from scratch, you should make space near your entryway or off of one of the more public rooms in your home.Typical powder rooms are about 20 square feet in size, and can be an easy extension to a living room or hallway. Pedestal sinks are a great way to save space when your powder room is on the smaller side, leaving plenty of legroom for guests. There are certain measurements and specifications that must be utilized in accordance with the IRC. The toilet and sink must always be accessible. But in most cases, this is easy to accomplish for your bathroom remodeling.
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