Take your bathroom remodeling to the next level! Customized bathrooms are a step beyond standard bathroom with the implementation of personalized cabinets, vanities, and facilities. While stock options are always available, many homeowners find that they need something just slightly bigger, smaller, wider, or in a different color. Some popular options include floating vanities and double-wide sinks. You can also invest in custom cabinets with your choice of wood, made in a specific style. Your opportunity to expand on your custom bathroom depends on your budget and style needs. Cabinets are very advantageous on the bathroom, sometimes even more so than in the kitchen. This is because storage space in the bathroom is always more necessary than homeowners think. Having wide cabinets and drawers with enough space to store linens, toiletries, and emergency supplies is a great way to make your custom bathroom both functional and beautiful. There are certain considerations needed for custom bathroom designs, however. For example, when choosing a type of wood for the cabinets, think about what kind of wood can stand up to moisture. Professionally-installed custom bathroom pieces are your best bet for guaranteeing that your cabinets will last for years.
Depending on the scale of your project, you might not need a full-on architectural commission, which involves extensive meetings, multiple job-site visits, and several sets of construction drawings, to the tune of about 8 percent of a project's construction budget. You might be able to tap an architect's design savvy by having him undertake a one-time design consultation. For example, for a $400 flat fee, Baton Rouge architect Kevin Harris will meet with a homeowner, examine the problem, and sketch out a few solutions that could be as simple as opening up a partition wall or moving a door. The homeowner can then give the sketch to a builder or take it to a drafting service, which will charge about $1 to $1.50 a square foot to crank out formal construction drawings.
Some people have a natural eye for design, but if you're more in the camp of those who can't do anything without consulting Pinterest board upon Pinterest board before making any major changes, we feel you. We'd love to have an interior designer on speed dial before deciding exactly where and how hang to hang that sweet new wall art we bought on a whim. But until we win the lottery, we'll have to settle for trusting our guts, and taking plenty of design tips where we can get them. We've compiled some secrets straight from the pros to help you with all your decorating needs.
If your addition calls for clapboard siding, for instance, you can save more in the long run by ponying up now for the preprimed and prepainted variety. It costs an extra 10 to 20 cents per foot, but "you'll wind up paying for half as many paint jobs down the road," says Paul Eldrenkamp, owner of Byggmeister, a design-build remodeling firm in Newton, Massachusetts. The reason? Factory finishes are applied on dry wood under controlled conditions—no rain, no harsh sun. "I used prefinished claps on my house about ten years ago and the only flaw in the finish is the occasional mildew spot, easily washed off," Eldrenkamp says. "The paint looks as if it'll be good for another ten years, easily."
Add a glossy frame. Artwork is always improved with the addition of a beautiful frame, and your wall space is no different. Update a room by adding color and shine to trim work and doors — the "frame" around the room. Highlight these areas with semi-gloss or gloss paint in a complementary hue to the wall color. Glossy finishes add sparkle and interest, and assist in differentiating one space from another. They also provide the added benefit of durability and long-lasting wear, especially in busy family gathering spaces.
Busting the budget is everyone's biggest fear when it comes to renovation. And with good reason. Even if you follow the essential advice we've been doling out for years—build in a 20 percent cushion to cover the nasty surprises, get contractor references and check them, banish the words "while you're at it" from your vocabulary—it's hard not to end up shelling out more than you want to, even if you want to pen a check for a million bucks.
You’re right that there should definitely be some kind of ventilation in a bathroom to prevent moisture build-up. My husband and I are remodeling our bathroom and removing the window that is attached to one wall (it’s just so awkward having one there) and installing a vent to replace it is definitely something we’ll want to look into. I’m not sure if we already have an inlet valve, but our toilet can be rather noisy, so we’ll have to talk to the contractor about that, as well.
Such welcoming and soothing colors. This palette beckons to those that are seeking a calm and serene oasis. These are very similar to the neutrals found in nature but in a more muted and calming effect. Instead of all shades of nature this focuses only on the subtle and soft palettes of mother nature. With the soft colors of the sand, forest and sky. A reminder of the beauty all around us.
Thanks for talking about the small details like air circulation in bathrooms. I never knew that you have to plan things like the mirrors around circulation, but now that I know that, I definitely want to get a professional remodeling contractor to do it for us. They would know what to look for and be able to do it well, so I’ll just leave it up to them! The air circulation in our bathroom right now is not very good, so that’s something I’d like to fix in our remodel.
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